Higher Living Challenge


Taking responsibility for my actions and impacts shows my love for my neighbour.  I think it also stands in contrast to the ‘my rights’ approach to living which some people live by… This is a challenge to live higher.  We’re up to the challenge!

1 “Whoever steals an ox or a sheep and slaughters it or sells it must pay back five head of cattle for the ox and four sheep for the sheep.

3 “Anyone who steals must certainly make restitution, but if they have nothing, they must be sold to pay for their theft. 4 If the stolen animal is found alive in their possession—whether ox or donkey or sheep—they must pay back double.

5 “If anyone grazes their livestock in a field or vineyard and lets them stray and they graze in someone else’s field, the offender must make restitution from the best of their own field or vineyard.

6 “If a fire breaks out and spreads into thornbushes so that it burns shocks of grain or standing grain or the whole field, the one who started the fire must make restitution.

7 “If anyone gives a neighbor silver or goods for safekeeping and they are stolen from the neighbor’s house, the thief, if caught, must pay back double. 8 But if the thief is not found, the owner of the house must appear before the judges, and they must determine whether the owner of the house has laid hands on the other person’s property. 9 In all cases of illegal possession of an ox, a donkey, a sheep, a garment, or any other lost property about which somebody says, ‘This is mine,’ both parties are to bring their cases before the judges. The one whom the judges declare guilty must pay back double to the other.

10 “If anyone gives a donkey, an ox, a sheep or any other animal to their neighbor for safekeeping and it dies or is injured or is taken away while no one is looking, 11 the issue between them will be settled by the taking of an oath before the Lord that the neighbor did not lay hands on the other person’s property. The owner is to accept this, and no restitution is required. 12 But if the animal was stolen from the neighbor, restitution must be made to the owner. 13 If it was torn to pieces by a wild animal, the neighbor shall bring in the remains as evidence and shall not be required to pay for the torn animal.

14 “If anyone borrows an animal from their neighbor and it is injured or dies while the owner is not present, they must make restitution. 15 But if the owner is with the animal, the borrower will not have to pay. If the animal was hired, the money paid for the hire covers the loss.
Exodus 22:1-15

It is interesting to me that when I read Exodus 21, which was about an eye for an eye and personal injury/harm, I was left with the idea that the intent of the law was retribution – a vengeance or punishment for the actions against others.

In Exodus 22, the topic shifts from retribution to restitution.  In fact, the word restitution appears several times in these fifteen verses.  When we do things to our neighbours – when our conduct has impact on others – restitution is required.  Make it right.  Restore it to the way it was.

We aren’t under this law in our lives today, yet this is an example of where the law makes sense.  It’s practicable.  It is fair and good and right.  And should be motivated by love.  Not law.  The Law provided rules which showed Israel’s love for God through their obedience.

Jesus raises the stakes and teaches that we ought to love our  neighbour as ourselves.

Taking responsibility for my actions and impacts shows my love for my neighbour.  I think it also stands in contrast to the ‘my rights’ approach to living which some people live by… This is a challenge to live higher.  We’re up to the challenge!

Amen.

Marc Kinna

 

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