Tree of Grace


God specializes in grace. God bridges the gap of broken people and broken promises to create newness of life based on his great and precious promises. This is illustrated in the story of Jesus’ family tree and the redemption stories of his ancestors…

1 This is the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah the son of David, the son of Abraham:

5 Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab,
Boaz the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth,
Obed the father of Jesse,
6 and Jesse the father of King David.
David was the father of Solomon, whose mother had been Uriah’s wife…
Matthew 1:1, 5-6

Yesterday we reflected on the inclusion of Tamar in the genealogy of Jesus. Her story is one of disgrace for her and her father in law, Judah. Today we continue to review the line of Jesus and see that Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba are mentioned.

We don’t have the backstory of how Rahab and Salmon came together to produce Boaz, or of how he becomes the great man who acts as the kinsman redeemer for Ruth. We surmise, though, that Boaz overcame his past and roots as the son of a prostitute to become someone great in the kingdom of God.

Likewise, we see that Solomon, the wisest King who ever lived, was born through a union which resulted in terrible consequences, both for Uriah, whom David had killed, and Solomon’s older brother, who died within days of his birth. Solomon overcame this family history to move forward and be used by God.

This is the story of grace. God uses broken vessels who are overshadowed by grace to be a part of great and wonderful things. It is not an accident that Jesus came through a line which includes such stories of real life and grace. God didn’t fix it so that Jesus’ history was unblemished. Rather, Jesus’ own mother wore the shame of being an unwed mother.

God specializes in grace. God bridges the gap of broken people and broken promises to create newness of life based on his great and precious promises. I’m thankful for families trees steeped in grace…

Amen.

Marc Kinna

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